CDC Guidelines For Facility Cleaning and Disinfection

CDC Guidelines For Facility Cleaning and Disinfection
Originally published by the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as Cleaning and Disinfecting Your Facility


CDC continues to study the spread and effects of the novel coronavirus across the United States. This interim guidance from the CDC is based on what is currently known about the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). COVID-19 is a respiratory illness that can spread from person to person. It is unknown how long the air inside a room occupied by someone with confirmed COVID-19 remains potentially infectious. Facilities will need to consider factors such as the size of the room and the ventilation system design (including flowrate [air changes per hour] and location of supply and exhaust vents) when deciding how long to close off rooms or areas used by ill persons before beginning disinfection. Taking measures to improve ventilation in an area or room where someone was ill or suspected to be ill with COVID-19 will help shorten the time it takes respiratory droplets to be removed from the air.

This guidance provides recommendations on everyday steps for cleaning and disinfection, when someone is sick and considerations for employers. It is aimed at limiting the survival of the virus in the environments.

FACILITY CLEANING AND DISINFECTING WHEN SOMEONE IS SICK

 

  • Close off areas used by the person who is sick.
  • Open outside doors and windows to increase air circulation in the area.
  • Wait 24 hours before you clean or disinfect. If 24 hours is not feasible, wait as long as possible.
  • Clean and disinfect all areas used by the person who is sick, such as offices, bathrooms, common areas, shared electronic equipment like tablets, touch screens, keyboards, remote controls, and ATM machines.
  • If more than 7 days since the person who is sick visited or used the facility, additional cleaning and disinfection is not necessary.
    • Continue routing cleaning and disinfection.

 

WHEN CLEANING

Wear disposable gloves and gowns for all tasks in the cleaning process, including handling trash.

  • Additional personal protective equipment (PPE) might be required based on the cleaning/disinfectant products being used and whether there is a risk of splash.
  • Gloves and gowns should be removed carefully to avoid contamination of the wearer and the surrounding area.

Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds.

  • Always wash immediately after removing gloves and after contact with a person who is sick.
  • Hand sanitizer: If soap and water are not available and hands are not visibly dirty, an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol may be used. However, if hands are visibly dirty, always wash hands with soap and water.

Additional key times to wash hands include:

  • After blowing one’s nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • After using the restroom.
  • Before eating or preparing food.
  • After contact with animals or pets.
  • Before and after providing routine care for another person who needs assistance (e.g., a child).

 

HOW TO CLEAN AND DISINFECT

Hard (Non-porous) Surfaces

  • Wear disposable gloves when cleaning and disinfecting surfaces. Gloves should be discarded after each cleaning. If reusable gloves are used, those gloves should be dedicated for cleaning and disinfection of surfaces for COVID-19 and should not be used for other purposes. Consult the manufacturer’s instructions for cleaning and disinfection products used. Clean hands immediately after gloves are removed.
  • If surfaces are dirty, they should be cleaned using a detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.
  • For disinfection, most common EPA-registered household disinfectants should be effective.
    • A list of products that are EPA-approved for use against the virus that causes COVID-19 is available herepdf iconexternal icon. Follow manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products for (concentration, application method and contact time, etc.).
      • Additionally, diluted household bleach solutions (at least 1000ppm sodium hypochlorite) can be used if appropriate for the surface. Follow manufacturer’s instructions for application, ensuring a contact time of at least 1 minute, and allowing proper ventilation during and after application. Check to ensure the product is not past its expiration date. Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser. Unexpired household bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted.
  • Prepare a bleach solution by mixing:
    • 5 tablespoons (1/3rd cup) bleach per gallon of water or
    • 4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water

Soft (Porous) Surfaces

  • For soft (porous) surfaces such as carpeted floor, rugs, and drapes, remove visible contamination if present and clean with appropriate cleaners indicated for use on these surfaces. After cleaning:
    • Launder items as appropriate in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. If possible, launder items using the warmest appropriate water setting for the items and dry items completely.
      • Otherwise, use products that are EPA-approved for use against the virus that causes COVID-19pdf iconexternal icon and that are suitable for porous surfaces.

Electronics

  • For electronics such as cell phones, tablets, touch screens, remote controls, and keyboards, remove visible contamination if present.
    • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products.
    • Consider use of wipeable covers for electronics.
    • If no manufacturer guidance is available, consider the use of alcohol-based wipes or sprays containing at least 70% alcohol to disinfect touch screens. Dry surfaces thoroughly to avoid pooling of liquids.

Linens, clothing, and other items that go in the laundry

  • Wear disposable gloves when handling dirty laundry from an ill person and then discard after each use. If using reusable gloves, those gloves should be dedicated for cleaning and disinfection of surfaces for COVID-19 and should not be used for other household purposes. Clean hands immediately after gloves are removed.
    • If no gloves are used when handling dirty laundry, be sure to wash hands afterwards.
    • If possible, do not shake dirty laundry. This will minimize the possibility of dispersing virus through the air.
    • Launder items as appropriate in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. If possible, launder items using the warmest appropriate water setting for the items and dry items completely. Dirty laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people’s items.
    • Clean and disinfect clothes hampers according to guidance above for surfaces. If possible, consider placing a bag liner that is either disposable (can be thrown away) or can be laundered.

TYPES OF DISINFECTANTS

Disinfectants are created with one purpose: to kill microbes and pathogens. Common traditional active ingredients in disinfectants include alcohol, phenol, and chlorine. Understanding your active ingredients can help you make a better choice when deciding which disinfectant to use in commercial and industrial facility maintenance.

Quaternary Ammonium Compounds (Quats)
A top choice for disinfection in hospital and institutional settings because of their low cost and quick action against a wide range of microorganisms. Quats can be formulated with a variety of detergents to provide both cleaning and disinfecting ability. Pine-sol Cleaner and Antibacterial and Fantastik All Purpose Cleaner are examples of quat-based disinfectants with both cleaning power and broad spectrum kill claims for many common and dangerous bacteria and viruses. Quats need a longer contact time with surfaces after spraying. 10 minutes is the typical wait time before being wiped off. Surfaces treated with Quats should be rinsed prior to direct contact with food.

Chlorine Compounds
Chlorine-based compounds are effective against a wide variety of microorganisms including bacterial spores and kill an array of organisms including resistant viruses. They are widely used to disinfect water, medical equipment, and surface areas as well as bleaching materials such as cloth. Chlorine-based disinfectants are inexpensive and have relatively quick kill times, however they can be corrosive and cause discoloration as well as irritation if not used as directed. Clorox is an example of a chlorine disinfectant, ideal for use in healthcare settings and food preparation processing. As a surface disinfectant, chlorine bleach is approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use in safe food production. It is also used to help prevent the spread of infections in homes, hospitals, nursing homes, schools and day care facilities.

Alcohols
When diluted in water, alcohols are effective against a wide range of bacteria, though higher concentrations are often needed to disinfect wet surfaces. Alcohol solutions with at least 70 percent alcohol are effective against the coronavirus on hard surfaces. First, clean the surface with water and detergent. Apply the alcohol solution (do not dilute it) and let it sit on the surface for at least 30 seconds to disinfect. The downsides are they evaporate quickly (and thus may not remain on the surface long enough to kill), they’re flammable, and they may not have organic soil tolerance claims, meaning they may not be effective when organic matter (blood, for example) is present.

Hydrogen Peroxide
Hydrogen Peroxide is an effective disinfectant that will kill viruses, bacteria, and other germs, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Hydrogen peroxide works as a disinfectant by destroying essential components of germ cells, and can deactivate a wide range of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and spores. For facility cleaning it is often mixed with peracetic acid to achieve specific disinfecting claims. These strong oxidizers can be highly reactive if mixed with other chemicals or come in contact with various surfaces. Their efficacy range is somewhat limited and at high concentrations they are dangerous. Peroxy HDOX is an EPA Registered Hydrogen Peroxide based cleaner, disinfectant, sanitizer, virucide, fungicide, and deodorizer.

Visit https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-againstsars-cov-2 to find the current list of products that meet EPA’s criteria for use
against SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19.


Our hearts go out to all impacted by the virus, either directly or indirectly. You are not alone in this crisis. We encourage you to reach out with any questions or concerns. Times like these remind us just how connected we really are. All of us at NY Brite are committed to being your partner and persevering together in all the days and years ahead.

Wishing all of you health and wellness, The NY Brite Team